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See what we have to say about the latest news on child safety, CPR and your family health.

Gagging versus severe choking.

Posted by on November 9, 2017 in First Aid, First aid for children, Infant CPR, Toddler safety | Comments Off on Gagging versus severe choking.

Gagging versus severe choking.

Gagging: Is normal Baby’s gag reflex is close to the front of the mouth. Gagging gets food or objects out of the back of mouth. Gagging is nature’s way of preventing airway obstruction. Baby is making sound such as coughing or the gagging sound. No need to intervene. Severe Choking: An object is lodged in the airway. There is no sound. The airway is blocked. There is no breathing or air movement. Baby’s color is blue around the lips. It’s a medical emergency. You must intervene. Perform the Infant choking maneuver. Call...

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Should your child get a flu shot?

Posted by on October 14, 2017 in Child safety, Family safety, First aid for children, Toddler safety | Comments Off on Should your child get a flu shot?

Should your child get a flu shot?

The flu can be very dangerous and young children are at the highest risk of getting it. The flu spreads when someone with the flu coughs and sneezes. The virus is in the air and anyone breathing can get infected. The virus can also be on surfaces such as toys and when your child touches that surface and puts her hands to her nose, eyes or mouth she can become infected. The symptoms include: Congestion Headache Vomiting Sore throat Cough Fever — as high as 103 to 105 degrees Fahrenheit Chills Muscle and body aches If you think your child...

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Surviving a heart attack when you’re alone.

Posted by on October 13, 2017 in General News | Comments Off on Surviving a heart attack when you’re alone.

Surviving a heart attack when you’re alone.

1. Let’s say it’s 7:25 pm and you’re going home (alone of course) after an unusually hard day on the job. 2. You’re really tired, upset and frustrated. 3. Suddenly you start experiencing severe pain in your chest that starts to drag out into your arm and up in to your jaw. You are only about five km from the hospital nearest your home. 4. Unfortunately you don’t know if you’ll be able to make it that far. 5. You have been trained in CPR, but the guy that taught the course did not tell you how to perform it...

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October is safe sleep month.

Posted by on October 4, 2017 in Child safety, Family safety, Infant and child safety | Comments Off on October is safe sleep month.

October is safe sleep month.

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How to remove a tick.

Posted by on July 15, 2016 in Child safety, First Aid | Comments Off on How to remove a tick.

How to remove a tick.

Ticks and Lyme disease. New Jersey is a hot spot for Lyme disease. The ticks are found in wooded areas with lots of bushes and grasses. The disease is transmitted to humans from infected deer and mice ticks from about May to September. The tick is typically found in warm moist areas such as underarms, back of the knees. The tick must be attached to the human host for at least 36 to 48 hours to transmit disease. It attaches and feeds from the host blood then falls off. Not all ticks carry the bacteria that causes lyme disease. The first...

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Prevent drownings with pool safety tips.

Posted by on May 31, 2016 in General News | Comments Off on Prevent drownings with pool safety tips.

Prevent drownings with pool safety tips.

New CPSC Report: Fatal Child Drownings in Pools Down 11 Percent Nationwide Since 2010 Despite decrease, drowning is still the leading cause of unintentional death among children ages 1 – 4; second leading cause of death in children ages 5 – 14 years old WASHINGTON – A new report released today by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) shows that the number of fatal child drownings in swimming pools has decreased 11 percent nationwide since 2010, the year the agency launched its Pool Safely public education campaign. Despite the...

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National Poison Prevention week 2016.

Posted by on March 24, 2016 in Child safety, Family safety, Infant and child safety, Toddler safety | Comments Off on National Poison Prevention week 2016.

National Poison Prevention week 2016.

John F. Kennedy who proclaimed National Poison Prevention Week in early 1962, together with his son, John F. Kennedy Jr. National Poison Prevention Week is particularly concerned with preventing the poisoning of children, who are the major victims of poisoning. According to the CPSC an estimated 85,000 children younger than 5 are unintentionally poisoned each year in the U.S. Poisoning can happen when a child swallows medications, liquid laundry Packets, pesticides, alcohol, drain cleaner, vitamins or spills or inhales bleach or other...

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First aid for animal bites in children.

Posted by on March 4, 2016 in Child safety, Family safety, First Aid, First aid for children, Infant and child safety | Comments Off on First aid for animal bites in children.

First aid for animal bites in children.

An animal bite can become infected due to bacteria in the animals mouth. It is very important to make sure your childs’ tetanus is up to date. Most animal bites are from dogs and cats. If your child is bitten by a wild animal it is important to report it to animal control. The animal may need to be captured and tested for rabies. Raccoons, foxes and bats carry and can transmit rabies. What should you do for an animal bite? Apply pressure if there is bleeding If the skin is broken contact the doctor (they may prescribe antibiotics, give...

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Frostnip.

Posted by on January 23, 2016 in Child safety, Cold Related emergencies, Family safety | Comments Off on Frostnip.

Frostnip.

It’s the time of year for outdoor fun. While playing outdoors in winter can be healthy and packed with fun for your child you need to be aware of some dangers. Children are at a greater risk of experiencing frostnip and frostbite because they lose heat from their skin more rapidly and they tend stay outside longer because they’re having so much fun. Frostnip also known as (Chillblains) is a milder form of frostbite. It is sometimes referred to as a first degree frostbite.There is no tissue destruction and the skin goes back to...

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Rethinking SIDS.

Posted by on December 4, 2015 in Child safety, Infant and child safety, SIDS | Comments Off on Rethinking SIDS.

Rethinking SIDS.

Rethinking SIDS: Many Deaths No Longer A Mystery   i Many cases once thought to be sudden infant death syndrome are now believed to be accidents caused by unsafe sleep practices. The image above shows a crib with a teddy bear and bumper — items the American Academy of Pediatrics warns against putting in your baby’s crib. The thought of a baby dying suddenly and unexpectedly is one that keeps parents awake at night, fearing the worst. For years, little was known about sudden infant death syndrome, or SIDS. Babies would die in their...

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