Drowning is the leading cause of unintentional deaths in children 1-4

Drowning is the leading cause of unintentional deaths in children 1-4

From Memorial Day through Labor Day 2017*, at least 163 children younger than age 15 fatally drowned in swimming pools or spas, according to media reports compiled by the USA Swimming Foundation, a Pool Safely campaign partner. Of the 163 reports, 112 of the victims — nearly 70 percent — were children younger than age five. During the same timeframe in 2016, 205 children younger than age 15 drowned in swimming pools or spas,...

Read More

What happened?

In any emergency with children, take “five” seconds to take a breath, make sure the scene is safe and try to figure out what happened. By determining what happened you can help the injured child. Ask yourself a few questions. 1. Did he choke? Is there small objects close by? Was he eating? 2. Is he in contact with fire, water, electricity? 3. Did he fall? 4. Is he moving? 5. Is he breathing? 6. Is there something he came in contact...

Read More

Take Five.

Seconds, that is. Do not jump head first into an emergency. It serves no purpose and may be dangerous to run into a situation without full awareness of your surroundings. If an infant or child is injured always “take 5” seconds to  stop, take a breath, look and access the scene. Ask yourself a few questions. What happened? Is the scene safe to help? How many people are involved? What’s my priority? Putting yourself in danger...

Read More

Among children ages 1 to 4 years, most drownings occur in residential swimming pools.

Most young children who drowned in pools were last seen in the home Had been out of sight less than five minutes Were in the care of one or both parents at the time More than one in five fatal drowning victims are children 14 and younger CDC Center for Disease Control and...

Read More